Bloomington Gold surprised the automotive industry when it trademarked the word "Survivor." Several magazines blasted the exclusive fraternity for such a move, wondering what was next. Bloomington Gold wanted to reserve the term for a rare collection of cars that have truly survived the years, maintaining their originality in every aspect of automotive preservation-be it paint, interior, engine condition, and so on. Being awarded a Survivor is a mark of excellence, a class unto itself in the Corvette judging-class group.

Jeremy Head of Orlando, Florida, owns a Survivor, and it still rolls on the original ZR-17 tires from the Bowling Green assembly line. At 26, he was lucky enough to land the car of his dreams, but not without some hard work. His passion for the car started 10 years prior when he saw his first ZR-1 at a car show, and vowed he would own one someday.

Fast forward eight years to a private automotive collector in Fort Wayne, Indiana, who sold the car to Jeremy with more than the usual package of paperwork. It came with every piece of paper imaginable with the car when it was driven off the showroom floor. Documentation included all General Motors and dealer-provided paperwork, the window sticker, buildsheet, compete owner's kit, brochures, handouts, literature, and foldout owner's booklet.

Jeremy's car was more than just another red-on-black '93 Corvette. From all 448 ZR-1s built in 1993, his is one of 22 painted Artic White. In addition, it was optioned with the ultra-rare white leather interior door inserts and seats that only 11 cars are documented to have. With the additional $950 for the Roof Package-a second removable roof panel in transparent blue-Jeremy boasts his is the only car with this cosmetic arrangement. The ultra-rare ZR-1 option nearly doubled the standard price from $34,595 to an astronomical $67,778.

For six years, the Mercury Marine-built four-cam small-block in the Corvette made a name for itself, dominating the streets and knocking down some of the mightiest opponents in the professional race circuit. The car was a wild step for GM in the early '90s, and sales proved it was a good one. It was well received despite its Porsche-comparable price tag, making Corvette owners reconsider their mortgages and monthly car payments.

Jeremy boasts of this car's originality with every turn. Nothing has been altered since the day it was built, even down to the ZR-17-rated tires. He hasn't turned a wrench to the car, and chooses to keep it for his private collection, like a priceless Van Gogh. Now he's petitioning the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky, to put it on display.