There are items that add a distinctive performance look to your Corvette, and some of those include a considerable measure of actual performance. Among these is the front spoiler. From the standpoint of function, a front spoiler deflects a portion of the airflow that would otherwise end up under the car, creating undesirable front-end lift at speed, improving stability. A good chunk of this deflected air finds its way through the radiator, which often provides a bonus in terms of improved engine cooling.

With these credible benefits at hand, it was no wonder that GM saw fit to install a spoiler at the front of production Corvettes for the '78 Indy Pace Car version. This factory spoiler became an option in the following year, while later Corvettes had a redesigned front fascia with an even more extensive air dam.

A real front spoiler wasn't a factory offering for our '76 Stingray project car. A factory Corvette in that year features large cooling holes in the lower valance blanking panel, used in tandem with a polyurethane baffle at the trailing edge. The baffle is designed with a lower lip protruding downwards as a sort of mini-spoiler, directing airflow through these holes and into the radiator area. While this imparts a degree of functionality, from the standpoint of style, the baffle just isn't the same as a true spoiler incorporated into the bodywork.

All that said, we were eager to add a front spoiler to our '76 Stingray, both to reap the potential performance improvements as well as for the great looks. We ordered a new spoiler (PN 10291) from Eckler's. This one-piece custom spoiler is similar to the factory offering but has rounded corners, which we felt better complemented the swooping lines of our car than the squared-off outer corners of the '78 factory unit. If preferred, Eckler's also offers the factory-styled spoiler (PN 10289), which comes at the same retail price.

These spoilers are one-piece bolt-on units, designed to utilize the mounting provisions for the factory air baffle at the rear of the valance. The factory air baffle does double-duty, with the lower lip serving as an air deflector, while the upper portion blanks the area between the lower valance and the radiator crossmember, forcing airflow through the radiator. The replacement spoiler will take the place of the air deflection function of the stock baffle, but the upper part of the baffle is still needed to blank the area below the radiator closed. To accomplish this, the lip portion of the factory baffle is cut off, and the top portion blanking the radiator is retained. For our installation, we left off the baffle completely for now and will be fabricating a custom sheet-aluminum blanking panel to serve the same purpose.

We were impressed with the fit of the Eckler's spoiler but even more excited by the purposeful and racy look it added to the front of our project car. As noted, the spoiler bolts on via the stock bolt holes used to mount the production baffle, but two additional fasteners are required at the fenders. Eckler's solution is a bolt-and-washer arrangement that clamps the top edge of the spoiler at the fender, requiring no drilling in the stock bodywork. While drilling no holes may be an important consideration to some Corvette owners, we could see room for improvement in the mounting technique if the stock fender lip is drilled for a series of through-bolts along the inside lip.

Difficulty Index - 2 Wrenches
Anyone's Project: no tools required1 Wrench
Beginner: basic tools2 Wrenches
Experienced: special tools3 Wrenches
Accomplished: special tools and outside help4 Wrenches
Professionals Only: send this work out5 Wrenches

Sources

Eckler's Industries
800/284-3906
www.ecklers.com

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